Year Six 2015-16

As in previous years, we will be running workshops- for parents only –

to learn about how subjects are taught in school.

Years 5 and 6  Maths Workshop – Wednesday 16th November from 9am to 10am.

 

ARITHMETIC – QUESTION TYPE, PRESENTATION, REHEARSAL, PROFICEINCY & SPEED

  • KS2 SATS ARITHMETIC PAPER is 30 minutes long with 36 questions worth 40 marks.
  • Questions are only presented as equations.
STRAND/type CALCUALTION DESCRIPTION EXAMPLES
1.    ADDITION

·   Simple place value addition

No written calculation required – recognition of increase of a specific place value 476 + 100 =
·  Simple unit & tenths addition No written calculation required – as above – recognition that addition will not impact other place values (carrying) 6.2 + 0.6 =
·   Simple unit, tenths & hundredths addition No written calculation required – recognition of the fact that there are no values in the second number to add to the first, also that the ‘5’ is in the hundredths place 2.5 + 0.05 =
·  4 digit number & 3 digit number addition Written calculation – place values must be aligned correctly if using column method as both numbers have different values, ‘carrying’ must be checked – number line method could be used 1,063 + 487 =      1063

487

·  4 digit number & 4 digit number addition Written calculation – largest number at top – place values must be aligned correctly if using column method as both numbers have different values, ‘carrying’ must be checked – number line method could be used 5,356 + 8,253 =   8253

5356

·   Addition of fractions with common denominator Numerators add to give total of denominator + =
·    Addition of fractions with an uncommon denominator Fractions where denominators are uncommon must be converted so that denominators are common. This is done by finding a common denominator. When denominators are converted, numerators must be converted by the same scales. Only then can the fractions’ numerators be added. + =

 

+ =

·  Addition of mixed numbers with fractions with uncommon denominators Fractions can be added in isolation from whole numbers however their denominators are not common and so must be converted before subtraction as must their numerators. 2 + =
2.    SUBTRACTION

·  Subtracting ‘9’

No written calculation required – identify the ten’s digit and reduce it by one ten then add one unit to adjust the subtraction of the extra unit – this is called ‘special case 9’ subtraction 463 − 9 =

463 – 10 + 1 =

·  Subtraction of round hundred from a five digit number No written calculation required – identify that 500 is half of a thousand, identify the thousand below and add on 500 40,000 − 500 =
· Subtraction of fractions with a common denominator Subtract the numerator of the second fraction from the first – no need for conversion of denominators because they are common – =
·  Subtraction of a unit, tenth and hundredth from a whole integer Can be done mentally, by subtracting unit, then decimal; can be done using ‘shopkeeper’s change’ number line method or for pupils who are not secure with their place value, a column subtraction incorporating a decimal point and zeroes as place holders for the whole integer – draw back for this method is ‘messy’ decomposition 14 − 6.01 =
·  Subtraction of mixed values As above – second and third methods 13.4 − 6.98 =
·  Decomposition columnar subtraction of ten thousand from hundred thousand Written subtraction method lining up place values in columns and subtracting place value by place value. Where a digit in a place value of the greater number cannot subtract a larger digit value of the smaller number, the next place value may be decomposed to create a larger value. 214,487 – 45,195 =

 

214,487

45,195

·   Subtraction of fractions with uncommon denominators Fractions where denominators are uncommon must be converted so that denominators are common. This is done by finding a common multiple of both denominators. When denominators are converted, numerators must be converted by the same scales. Only then can the fractions’ numerators be subtracted. – =
·   Subtraction of mixed numbers with uncommon denominators Fractions can be subtracted in isolation from whole numbers however their denominators are not common and so must be converted before subtraction as must their numerators. 2   – =
3.    MULTIPLICATION

·   Multiplication by 2/double

No written calculation required – number can easily be doubled as none of the place values will affect the others 132 × 2 =
·   Multiplication of two digit number by one digit number – out of tables range Short written compact method or partitioning 24 × 3 =

20 x 3 + 4 x 3 =

 

24

x   3

·  Use of commutative law within multiplication and associative law Numbers in multiplication can be rearranged in any way (commutativity). They can also be calculated in a different grouping (associativity). 5 × 3 × 4 =

 

5 x 4 x 3 = 20 x 3 =

·  Use of place value to multiply No written calculation required – recognition of movement of digits two places to the left to x by 100 4.16 × 100 =
· Short written compact method to multiply mixed values by single digit Short written compact method – multiply each value from the right to left 1.32 × 6 =

 

1.32

x     6

·   Long multiplication written method Multi-step multiplication – first by unit then by ten – then addition of both products in second phase

– 2 marks

   76

x 23

·  Multiplying fractions Multiply the numerator by numerator and denominator by the denominator x =
·   Multiplying fractions by a whole number Make the whole number a fraction numerator over one – or imagine (in this case 5 sets of one sixth) x 5 =

 

x =

4.    DIVISION

·   Recall of a known division fact

No written calculation required – recall of division fact or inverse x fact 54 ÷ 6 =
·   Identify related division fact No written calculation required – identification of related division fact being ten times bigger e.g.

144 ÷ 12 = 12; so 1440 ÷ 12 = 120

1,440 ÷ 12 =
·  Short compact method of division – single divisor Bus shelter method – address each digit left to right – carrying where remainders for division of each place value 7,505 ÷ 5 =

_______

5I 7 5 0 5

·  Division of a related three digit fact by a single digit divisor No written calculation required – in this case, the dividend (270) is a related fact of the divisor (9) and so it should be recognised as 27 ÷ 9 = 3; however, as 270 is ten times larger than 27 and the divisor has stayed the same, the answer must be ten times greater than in 27 ÷ 9 270 ÷ 9 =
·  Long division ‘chunking’ method Subtract ‘chunks’ from the dividend in multiples of divisor until left with zero or a remainder which cannot be divided – use knowledge of place value – doubling – quadrupling etc…      ________

1 3 I 3 0 1 6

·  Division of fractions When dividing fractions, simply ‘flip’ the second fraction and multiply the result ÷

 

x =

·  Division of fractions by a whole number Simply multiply the bottom number by the whole number and use the numerator as the numerator in the answer ÷ 5 =

 

5.    FRACTIONS, DECIMALS, PERCENTAGES (FDP)

·  Finding a fraction of a number

Divide number by denominator and multiply the answer by the numerator x 24 =   or of 18 =
·  Finding a percentage Divide value by 10 to find 10% then scale up or down to find correct %. E.g. in this example, 56 divides by 10 to find 10 % then multiply answer by 2 (double) to find 20% 20 % x 56

or 20% of 56

6.    Other

·  Squaring

Squaring – numbers multiply by themselves

7 x 7 =

·  Order of operations

BODMAS

Brackets, order, division, multiplication, addition, subtraction

In multi-step or multi-operation calculations, if there are brackets, do the operations within them before any others.   If there are no brackets, division or multiplication must be done (in order written) before subtraction or addition 20 − 4 × 2 =

20 – (4 x 2)=

20 – 8 =

 

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Year 6 Visited London Tuesday 21st July

All year 6 had a fabulous time in London- here are a few places they visited

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Year 6 Half Term Overview:

Spring – Second half term

 

 

Dear Parents,

 

We hope our families had a wonderful half-term break and that the children are now refreshed and ready to meet the new challenges that await them this half term as we approach SATs.

 

The Macbeth play workshops took place today, Wednesday 24th February; please ensure contributions towards this are given to the office this week.  Please also note this coming Thursday, 25th February, is dressing up day in House colours. 

 

Sports Relief events will take place in the week beginning Monday 14th March and the children will be invited to dress up on the Friday of that week. The week after we shall be celebrating World Book Week and the dressing up day for this will be Thursday 24th March.  Also taking place during this week will be the Easter Bonnet parade and Easter egg competitions! 

 

As ever, please can you ensure your child has appropriate, warm P.E. kit in school for our outdoor P.E. sessions.

 

This overview will tell you what we will be covering throughout the next half term. We hope you will find this useful and please feel free to ask any of the year six teachers any questions.

 

Mr Shennan, Mr Game and Mrs Smith

Year 6 Staff

English Newspapers and persuasive arguments
Maths Key concepts – Data handling, multi-step word problems and decimals / fractions/ percentages, algebra and co-ordinates.
Science Rocks and solids
Computing Maths and English revision.
P.E. Gymnastics and rugby (outdoor)
R.E. Being regardful of suffering.

Being merciful and forgiving.

 

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ATTENDANCE GAMES

Attendance Games Prizes

Year 6 games awarded for 12 days consecutively in school  with no absences

 

Amr, Ismaeel, Nathaniel and Yusuf

Amr, Ismaeel, Nathaniel and Yusuf

 

 

“Ecstatic, so ecstatic it was amazing to win £100 to spend on awesome games to play with.”

 

 

 

 

Ismail, Ali, Tokheel, Talha, Abid and Issa

Ismail, Ali, Tokheel, Talha, Abid and Issa

 

 

 

 

 

“It was a very nice opportunity to play with my friend on a game of monopoly.”

 

Binta, Yakine, Natasha, Zara and Aqsa

Binta, Yakine, Natasha, Zara and Aqsa

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

“Whilst eating cakes, we enjoyed the game Don’t Laugh.”

Olivia, Abida, Fatima and Dania

Olivia, Abida, Fatima and Dania

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

“Cakes, games and fun, all a child could want and all thanks to our attendance!”

 

 

 

 

 

 YEAR 6 OVERVIEW

year 6 page 1     Year 6 page 8

Year 6 page 3     Year 6 page 4

Year 6 page 5     Year 6 page 6

Year 6 Page 7     Year 6 page 9

 

 

Poetry Recitation Competition October 2015

There was a fantastic atmosphere around school as many children were practicing their poems to perform in the competitions in school.  The teachers were completely overcome at the effort that so many children put into this and the standard was amazingly high. Thank you to those parents who gave their children support in doing this – they really did you proud!

Year 6 Winning Poem

6G Visited the Buddhist Centre in Moseley on Tuesday 3rd November 2015

 

Year 6 found a very warm welcome when we visited Birmingham Buddhist Centre in Moseley last week.  We learnt a lot and even had a go at meditation. Pleasingly, Dave, our host, told us that the questions we asked were the best he’d had from a class yet! Nyla 6G

 

 

 

Year 6 Attendance Award – Lego Workshop

“It was so imaginative and great fun Yakine 6S”

“It connected with what we were learning about in English Isra 6S

lego 1   lego 2  lego 3   lego 4  lego 5    lego 7   lego 8   lego 9   lego 10   lego 12  lego 11   lgo 13

 

 

YEAR 6 EID PARTIES ON 23rd SEPTEMBER 2015

year 6 eid 4  year 6 eid 2  year 6 eid 3

 

 

 

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